"Take your Content To New Heights"

The Comedy of the Beatles

Comedy writing is an artform best left to the professionals. Just about every guy I know who thinks he can write has tried it — sometimes with favorable, albeit short lived, results. Making people laugh isn’t easy, and it requires a lot of practice even for the experts.

And yet, comedy is definitely something to study in the pursuit of writing. Famed pastor Andy Stanley said he likes to watch comedians perform because it gives him new ways to engage his audience and keep his material fresh.

Right now, you may be thinking the above photo is pretty darn silly. And it is, to be honest. But I want you to take a careful look at what’s going on here. To me, the highlight of the photo is over on the far right. I think each one of these guys has a fair sense of comic understanding. But John Lennon really takes the cake.

When I first saw this photo, I thought: “Ha ha. Okay. Whatever. It’s a staged shot with everyone acting silly. And John acting like a random crazy person just in a different vein.”

It’s not so at all. He’s doing something that I didn’t quite understand until much later. Here it is: in the shot, there is a clear sense of a catastrophe about to happen. Everyone is yelling: “No! Stop! Don’t do it!” to the barber guy. Amid the discordant cacophony that’s erupting, John uses the din to harmonize like someone would in a barber shop quartet.

While everyone is yelling “No!”, he’s found peace through a sonorous, tuneful expression of “no-ooh…” Hence the calm eyes and expression. He was the best, most creative lyricist of them all by far, and a master of visual comedy.

This photo makes me smile and feel happy every time I see it, thanks to John’s sublime irony. To everyone else, the scene is coming apart. To John, its come together.

Right now.

Over him.

Don’t like it? Then just “shoot me.”

Peace.

Later.

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This entry was posted on Sunday, February 9th, 2014 at 6:47 pm and is filed under Dallas writers, Social networking, Web Writing. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.